Product Watch: Moleskine dresses up Kindle Reader, bending Digital to Tangible.

Aaaah… the beloved Moleskine graces nubie products with its touch.

It’s amusing that once-printed books go digital for convenience, and then get thrown back into paper and leather. At the end of the day, a digital reader may be convenient, but the lack of tangible page-turning leaves something to be desired for some people; there’s just no way that oil-based products satisfy the need for touch, the way paper and leather do. Let’s slap a little leather around that Kindle, shall we?

I love to watch the dance between the furious pace of digital convenience and our tenacious hold on earthly goodness. It’s as if Digital Life were a toddler dashing into new territory, new adventure, while an invisible maternal hand coaxes it back to a slower, safer, time-tested place.

From a design-process standpoint, particularly as it applies to product design and user experience, this Moleskine-Kindle product solution is a great illustration that reading is not solely about communication with words, but it’s a physical engagement as well.

Moleskin fan? See more.

Similar:
Wood Trays for Wireless Keyboard and Trackpad
Steampunk Flash Drives

Designofile Destination: Pantone Hotel, Brussels. Talk about brand experience.

What designer isn’t a sucker for anything Pantone? Forget the mugs, how about fully immersing in a Pantone-driven environment, for a night?

Credits: Hotel was created under a Pantone licensing partnership, and Designed by Belgian interior designer Michel Penneman and Belgian architect Olivier Hannaert.

Aesthetic Trend: Retro-mechanical design on daily digital gizmos: memory sticks. Fully sculptural and gorgeous.

It seems that the nostalgia for days of tangible, organic material and comprehensible mechanics is steadily gaining speed in response to the increasing abstraction of digitized life. Will it remain a purely cosmetic quest?

Design Credit: Steampunk Memory Keys from back2root

Industrial Design: Freerider self-propelled skate offers alternative way to travel the streets.

It’s self-propelled, like a little vespa for your feet, with a flexible core that bends for carving, and large wheels for speed, grip and rolling over road obstacles. It’s lightweight, folds up, or can be thrown on your shoulder.

Another step towards a car-reduced future?

Design Credit:
Alon Karpman, Brooklyn Workshop. And Antonio Meze, antoniomeze.com, for Brooklyn Workshop, Inc.